Tuberculosis Research Team Members at CSU

The Colorado State University researcher team not only conducts basic scientific research into the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, it is devoted to finding cheap, easy and accurate ways to test for tuberculosis, new drugs to treat it, and vaccines to prevent tuberculosis before or after exposure. The University also houses a program that helps to test anti-tuberculosis compounds for other laboratories around the world.

John Belisle, Professor of Bacteriology and Director of the NIH Rocky Mountain Regional Center for Excellence, in the Biomolecular Analysis Core Laboratory at Colorado State University's Research and Innovation Center. March 7, 2012

John T. Belisle

Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Belisle focuses on the physiology of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis and immune system response, then using that information find new ways to treat, diagnose and prevent the disease. He also directs the Rocky Mountain Regional Center of Excellence, an intellectual center of experts collaborating on infectious disease research.

Belisle discusses the challenges of finding a way to cure tuberculosis as well as the complexities of research going into better understand the disease.


Tuberculosis research at Colorado State University


Patrick Brennan

University Distinguished Professor,Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Brennan founded CSU’s tuberculosis research program in 1980. A University Distinguished Professor and international leader in tuberculosis organizations, Brennan’s own research focuses on understanding the cell wall of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis and how it might be targeted with new drugs.

Brennan was the first tuberculosis researcher at Colorado State University and is credited with building the university’s tuberculosis drug, vaccine and test research program in the world. Today, as the “grandfather” of the program, he reflects upon building the largest TB research group in the world.


TB Research at Colorado State University


Delphi Chatterjee

Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Chatterjee’s work looks at the chemistry and pathogenesis of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis and developing an easy, accurate test for tuberculosis.

Chatterjee, a researcher devoted to finding new tests for tuberculosis, wants to keep it simple. She envisions a test that gives users a plus or minus sign, and she talks about the complications behind developing such a tool.



Dean Crick

Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Crick directs the university’s mycobacteria laboratories. His research focuses on the biochemistry of the infected lung’s response to the bacterium that causes tuberculosis.

Crick discusses his tuberculosis research through biochemistry, and how, chemically, cancerous tumors and how tuberculosis manifests in the lungs are very similar.



Mary Ann DeGroote

Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

DeGroote is an infectious-disease trained physician who provides a link between researchers in the university’s tuberculosis program and the medical field. DeGroote also continues to see patients at a Denver hospital.

DeGroote works with University tuberculosis researchers to help develop useful vaccines, tests, and medicine to treat people with TB.



Karen M. Dobos

Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Dobos’ work in tuberculosis focuses on finding new vaccines and diagnostic tools. Her research goals include developing a cheap, fast, simple and specific test for tuberculosis.

Dobos is working to uncover ways to easily diagnose tuberculosis, including latent tuberculosis. She discusses that work and the personal experiences she has had with tuberculosis, which drive her research.



Mary Jackson

Mycobacteria Research Laboratories Director
Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Jackson’s research focuses on understanding the cellular wall surrounding the bacterium that causes tuberculosis to provide opportunities for new drugs to penetrate the wall.

Jackson talks about how the waxy shell around the bacterium that causes tuberculosis makes it difficult treat, and how her research at Colorado State is working to break through that barrier with the magic of science.



Anne Lenaerts

Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Lenaerts has developed a number of laboratory tests and systems to improve and accelerate the testing of TB drugs. These technologies are used by laboratories around the globe.

Lenaerts talks about her goal to find new drugs to treat tuberculosis, and several new compounds that are promising. Lenaerts, a researcher at Colorado State University, lived in Africa and saw the impacts of tuberculosis first-hand.



Ian Orme

University Distinguished Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

Orme researches how tuberculosis impacts the immune response. His work focuses on developing vaccines for tuberculosis, including a post-exposure, preventative vaccine.

Orme talks about how the emergence of HIV has impacted the spread of tuberculosis across the globe, and his interest in how tuberculosis impacts the immune response. His work focuses on developing a post-exposure vaccine for tuberculosis.